Happy Birthday, Bob Fosse!

scan0458Robert Louis Fosse was born on this day (June 23rd), 1927. Growing up in Chicago, young Bob Fosse was obsessed with Fred Astaire, the king of Hollywood’s Golden Age of movie musicals. As a boy Fosse would watch his famous films and try to imitate not only Astaire’s tapping feet, but also his debonair style and enchanting charm. At age twenty-five, Fosse landed his own contract with Hollywood’s MGM studios as a dancer in movies such as Kiss Me, Kate, Give A Girl A Break, and The Affairs of Dobie Gillis. One day Fred Astaire bumped into Fosse while on the MGM set. Astaire politely introduced himself and, before walking away, casually kicked a nail that was lying on the ground, causing it to ricochet in an intricate pattern that simply mesmerized Fosse. After Astaire left, Fosse recovered that nail and worked for hours to reenact its choreography—with the same ease and grace of Astaire.

But Bob Fosse certainly didn’t always stand in the shadows of Fred Astaire; he went on to revolutionize American theatre dance. His blend of awesome sensuality, clever humor, cinematic insight, popular references, and a hint of cynicism made musical theatre contemporary, consumable, and controversial. Fosse was one of the greatest dance visionaries of the 20th century. He directed and choreographed over twenty-three films and Broadway musicals and won four Oscars and eight Tony Awards (more than any other choreographer). Additionally, Fosse is the only person ever to have won the “Triple Crown:” a Tony for Pippin, an Oscar for Cabaret, and an Emmy for Liza Minnelli’s television concert, Liza with a ‘Z’—all in 1973.

Today, the signature style of bowler hats, turned-in toes, and stooped shoulders is universally recognized simply as “Fosse.” His innovative, internalized, character-driven style helped define a new vernacular in the art of American Musical Theatre, making “Fosse” a renowned genre of dance all its own. Bob Fosse’s legacy lives on onstage in musicals such as Chicago and Sweet Charity, in pop culture references and inspiration, and through Fosse Master Classes produced by The Verdon Fosse Legacy LLC.


50th Anniversary of “Sweet Charity” on Broadway 1966-2016

BarSceneDrinkToday we celebrate the half century anniversary of Tony Award winning American musical Sweet Charity.

In January 1966, The Nederlanders turned New York City’s famed Palace Theatre into a legitimate theatrical stage for the opening of Sweet Charity conceived, staged and choreographed by Bob Fosse starring Gwen Verdon.

Gwen Verdon played the title role of Charity Hope Valentine, a taxi dancer at a dance hall called the “Fan-Dango Ballroom” in Times Square, New York City.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY Gwen Verdon! “Glamorous Redhead” 1959

Today celebrate with us the birthday of one of America’s brightest stage and screen stars, Gwenyth Evelyn Verdon born January 13, 1925.

Age 34 “Glamorous Redhead Gwen Verdon” Magazine Cover 


“The Theatre, Magazine of Drama, Comedy, Music”

from “January, 1959″ sold for “25 cents”

“Broadway’s Complicated Redhead Gwen Verdon dances like a goddess lives like a recluse and is the sole support of the town’s most popular musical.” Continue reading

Bob Fosse Dancin’ national tour press photograph, 1980

Bob Fosse’s Tony award winning musical revue Dancin’ national tour original black and white news print press proof photograph. With verso publication date red ink blind stamped “DEC 24 1980” having corresponding newspaper clipping affixed reading:

By Robert Alan Ross, St. Petersburg Times Critic

The show has no plot, message or consistent characters. Even so, Dancin’ delivers what its title promises. As one players says in his first-act greeting, it’s “dancing, some singing, and a lot more dancing.”

Strong, attractive and well-rehearsed, the national touring company of Dancin’ opening a six day local visit Tuesday night at the Bayfront theater, pleasing a capacity audience with Bob Fosse’s carnival of musical motion.”

A COLLECTION of routines that earned a Tony for director/choreographer Fosse in 1978, Danicn’ steps through a dozen styles in its three acts. But there’s an obvious reason for the apostrophe in the title.”DancinLine1980FBcv

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Gwen Verdon “Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus” Sweet Charity, 1966

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus officially announces today that they are eliminating elephant acts from their shows and all elephants will be relocated to their Center for Elephant Conservation.

The circus plans to phase out elephant acts by 2018.  Their 43 elephants will live at the company’s 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in central Florida. Twenty-nine animals are already there, and the other 14 will arrive as they are phased out from the circus. Elephant acts have been showcased by Ringling Bros for more than a century.

Pictured below are two original black and white press call or news print publicity photograph proofs featuring Gwen Verdon in full costume as Charity Hope Valentine in the original 1966 Tony award winning Broadway “musical smash” hit Sweet Charity conceived, staged and choreographed by Bob Fosse.  Gwen Verdon is pictured gallantly waving her right arm atop a Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus performance used elephant with side promotional panels reading “Sweet Charity.”GwenRinglingBro Continue reading

Bob Fosse Dancin’ musical revue production photographs, 1978

Eleven promotional black and white production performance photographs featuring the “18 very hardworking dancers” of Bob Fosse’s Tony Award winning three act Broadway musical revue Dancin’ stepping through dozens of dance styles.

Calypso “Percussion” company end Act I

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Bob Fosse Dancin’ musical revue rehearsals, 1978

Seven candid black and white rehearsal photographs featuring the “18 very hardworking dancers” of Bob Fosse’s Tony Award winning Broadway three act musical revue Dancin’ stepping through dozens of dance styles.

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Bob Fosse “RECOLLECTIONS OF AN OLD DANCER” three act Dancin’ program, 1978

Bob Fosse as interviewed by Kevin Kelly for the Boston Globe, 1978

“I guess I’ve learned bits and pieces from just about everything I’ve done. But, still I’m not kidding when I say I have periodic bouts of fear about what I’m doing. I deal with. I come out OK.

Right now, in the middle of Dancin’, the fear’s minimal. One of the reasons is that it’s not a big Broadway musical in the financial sense. It’s relatively simple, not a million dollar zinger. It’s a big modest Broadway musical, emphasis on modest. It’s a bit easier to work without all that heavy financial pressure. The show’s in three acts, with simple but effective scenery. The three acts are not just for innovation. The cast is made up of 18 very hardworking dancers and they need the intermissions to recoup. There’s no book, just a series of dance pieces some telling a story, some existing for themselves.”

Dancin’ 1978 souvenir performance program having front cover illustration art by Bob GillNewDancin

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