Why “www.VerdonFosse.com” ?

Personal stationery top center titled “Verdon – Fosse” and below reading longhand in ink “Thank you Gwen” 

After receiving Bob Fosse’s estate, all official documents came to Gwen Verdon titled “Verdon – Fosse.” Additionly we are paying homage to her own personlized stationery. See above.

Bob Fosse’s “Life as a Long Rehearsal” American Film, 1979

American Film | Magazine of the Film and Television Arts | November 1979
Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz: A Life As Extravaganza

“Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz is a confessional, hallucinatory extravaganza.  Here is his candid assessment of frenetic life in film and theater.” Continue reading

“Gwen Verdon: too hot for Hollywood?” Tempo News, 1955

“She’s everything the undesirable made absolutely and forever desirable.”

An overview photograph of “Gwen Verdon: too hot for Hollywood?” news article appearing in “Tempo News.” Tempo or “Quick News” was a weekly supermarket check-out magazine aimed towards the suburban American housewife market of the 1950s. Measuring 4 x 5 3/4 inches.

This particular Tempo News issue was published “July 18, 1955.”

Brian's property Article captions reading in-part: Continue reading

Gwen Verdon’s personal performace scrapbook, 1950s

Pictured above housed within an archival paper storage box clearly side labeled “Fosse Verdon Archives” is dancer Gwen Verdon’s personal scrapbook, about 40 detached pages dating from the 1940s to early 1960s with the majority of clippings and content dating from the 1950s. Most pages are double sided and overall contain hundreds of photographs and newspaper clippings spanning three of her five decade or half-a-century career in the American performing arts.

Three interior affixed scrapbook newspaper clippings read: “Small World By Douglas Watt, Show People,  Continue reading

Bob Fosse’s Chicago rare press photo after musician strike, 1975

Pictured above an image of “ticket-seekers” line formed outside of the 46th Street Theatre. Having the marque top billing centered reading “Gwen Verdon Chita Rivera Jerry Orbach, Chicago, A Musical Vaudeville” also reading Continue reading

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER EXCLUSIVE: HBO, Bryan Singer Adapting Bob Fosse Story

Bryan Singer is going from mutants and giants to the life of one of the great choreographer-directors of the 20th Century, Bob Fosse.

Singer (X-MenJack the Giant Killer) is slated to direct the project, which is to be a feature-length film designed for the premium cable network. Neil Meron and Craig Zadan, the duo behind movies such as Hairspray and Chicago, is exec producing with Singer. Nicole Fosse, daughter of Bob Fosse and Gwen Verdon, will serve as Executive Co-Producer.

The project, now untitled and in early development, will be a co-production with Sony Television.

An actor, dancer, choreographer and stage and screen director, Fosse presented a version of his life in his autobiographical 1979 feature All That Jazz. That Oscar-winning film starred Roy Scheider as a hard-living choreographer/director determined to push the envelope.

After several early film appearances in such movies as Kiss Me Kate, Fosse moved to Broadway, where he choreographed such shows as The Pajama Game and Damn Yankees. On Yankees, he met his future wife, dancer Gwen Verdon.

Fosse created his own, immediately recognized jazz dance style, full of bowler hats, jazz hands, angular hip thrusts and shrugging shoulders.

On Broadway, he went on to direct and choreograph such shows as RedheadSweet CharityPippin and Chicago.

He made his film debut as a director with the 1969 movie version of Sweet Charity, starring Shirley MacLaine. His second feature, Cabaret, won eight Oscars, including best director and best picture. In addition to All That Jazz, his other feature credits include Lenny, which starred Dustin Hoffman as comedian Lenny Bruce, and Star 80, in which Mariel Hemingway played murdered Playboy centerfold Dorothy Stratten.

The Innovative Choreographers U.S. Postal Stamp series include Bob Fosse

On National Dance Day, July 28th 2012, the U.S. Postal Service paid tribute to four influential choreographers who changed the art of dance: Isadora Duncan, José Limón, Katherine Dunham, and Bob Fosse. Designed to look like posters advertising a performance, the stamp art captures the luminosity and mystery of a live dance performance.

Bob Fosse, celebrated for directing and choreographing musicals on both stage and screen, is shown on the set of Sweet Charity (1969). Fosse received one Oscar, three Emmys, and nine Tony awards during his career. Yet perhaps his greatest contribution was in making dance accessible to millions.

Art director Ethel Kessler designed the stamps using illustrations by James McMullan, widely known for his work for Lincoln Center Theater in New York City.

The Innovative Choreographers stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail one-ounce rate.